West Door

Door_MG_7270

Apart from the difficulty of finding a true vertical/level reference point, I found this particular door really weird to look at.  It seemed to me the door was smaller than in reality. I think it might be a question of proportions rather than perspective.  The door is in the west wall of the tower of this particular church.

westdoor_MG_7269

—-Stephen—-
ecclesiarum.wordpress.com/

 

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11 thoughts on “West Door

  1. It is the effect of the window placed so close above it that distorts the visual effect of the door. I would guess that they were not cut at the same time. It hardly looks like there is space for a ceiling-floor between the two openings. Are they both an actual door and an actual window? is one of them just for looks or now no longer in use ? – I would guess the door is now blind. An interesting affair anyway.
    Are there other similar irregularities in the rest of this building ?

    • I can’t say whether the door was cut later or earlier than the window – however, both have similar moulding round them. This wall is the west side of the tower of the church which was built in about 1340.
      The space behind the door and window is continuous with no evidence of an intermediate floor – there is a vaulted ceiling at the base of the tower whose upward curve starts about a foot or so above the top of the moulding seen here.
      Both the window, which has some stained glass and the door are still used. On the other side of the door, there are slots to place a timber across the door to stop it from being opened – part of the reason for the tower, like so many in these parts of England, was to be defensive against raids by Scots – I see no reason why the door should be opened.

      You raise a good question regarding irregularities within the church. Like most of the churches we have of this period, this has been altered over the years – ‘extensions’ have been added, roofs changed walls taken down etc. This is one of the reasons they fascinate me so much – trying to ‘read’ the changes against possible date and reason – few records seem to be available – is half the fun.

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