They Walk Amongst Us

A trip to the Peak District prompted a few short countryside hikes, while giving me a chance to practice my photography. On the very first day, I took this photo – as a bit of a scene setter, so to speak. What I didn’t notice was this character in the background of this shot – nor did either of other two family members with me. How we missed it, I don’t know – perhaps we were using all our concentration on keeping our footing as it was very muddy and slippy under foot.

—Stephen G. Hipperson—

What did I say?

Almost as bad as ‘I told you so!’ – but as predicted our moley house builders looked to have come a cropper in the lastest flooding of the local Ings. Judging by the height of the debris line, the water might have been as much as 6ft deep here overnight. I’m not sure the little blighters would necessarily have got drown, as I saw evidence of fresh disturbance from underneath on a few of the mounds.

—-Stephen G. Hipperson—

Molehill Landscape

Looks as if the mole’s town planners are as good ours at the moment … see a bit of green and build a house on it. AND, in this case, they also seem to be ignoring the basic good sense of avoiding flood plains as this field regularly floods every year.

—Stephen G. Hipperson—

After Sunset

Went for a swift hike down the local disused rail track, now used as cycle/walking-the-dog byway. Happened to clear the tree cover just after the sun had gone down and was able to take this shot. The reflection in the foreground is of a large puddle in the ajoining arable field. More of a ‘research’ photo really – as the wind was preventing a smooth surface and the middle ground lacks any real interest.

—Stephen G. Hipperson—

‘Sea of Steps’

Frederick H Evans is one of my photographic heros, priniciply down to his architectural photography work. One of his most famous photographs is called Sea of Steps, taken at Wells Cathedral – the steps to the Chapter House. This fact was nowhere in my mind when we visited Wells Cathedral in October, you can guess my reaction when I turned the corner to see these steps – instant recollection from nowhere is a powerful drug.

I could only grab a snap of the steps which were the subject of his work – I didn’t have the right lens, I didn’t have a tripod, there were tourists wandering up and down the steps, I was in the way, I couldn’t get the right angle and they have a hand rail in the wrong place. All the excuses in the book. Nevertheles, it was great to see the steps in real life.

As an aside, I was privileged to handle some of the beautiful images he produced during my studies of photography. It’s difficult to describe the beauty of them, the delicacy of the toning of his platinum prints was awesome.

—Stephen G. Hipperson—